Motion Picture Camera technology has come a long way in the Century since it was first introduced, or has it?

The early Pioneers like Edwin Porter, Auguste and Louis Lumière and Georges Méliès all started the magic with little strips of “Film” 35mm wide to tell their stories.

Moving on to the Golden days of the silent’s Chaplin, Chaney and D.W. Griffith continued to tell stories and advance the art by exposing shadows and light on that same 35mm film.

Next came the introduction to talkies, a revolution in how movies were made. Almost over night the industry changed, if you didn’t sound like you looked, you were out on the street looking in. But still 35mm was the standard.

Thru out the 30’s, 40’s and the 50’s new technologies emerged, from the breath taking images we saw from Technicolor to the “Wide “ screen aspects like Vista vision and Todd AO. Cinema was now truly an art form. But with all these advancements the basic image was 35mm.

Even the New medium, Television the workhorse format for production for most programs was 35mm film.

Moving to the turn of the Century we now have seen the replacement of Film with the “Digital” Revolution. Today we store images on hard drives, flash media and stream it on the web… But…

All the manufacturers these days are building their latest cameras based on… You guessed it: 35mm.

It seems that no matter the recording media the tried and true way to “see” the world was and still is the 35mm format.

I wonder what George Eastman and Thomas Edison would say?

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